Statement on the Passing of Sister Antona Ebo

November 11, 2017
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
For more information contact: 
Gabe Jones
Media Relations Specialist
Phone: 314.792.7557

ST. LOUIS – Most Reverend Robert J. Carlson, Archbishop of St. Louis, released the following statement upon the death of Sister Antona Ebo, FSM:

I am saddened to hear of the passing of renowned civil rights leader Sister Antona Ebo. We will miss her living example of working for justice in the context of our Catholic faith.

I ask that the faithful of the Archdiocese of St. Louis join me in praying for the repose of the soul of Sister Ebo. Her family, friends, and her religious community will continue to be in our thoughts and prayers.

May her soul, and the souls of all the faithful departed, rest in peace.

Sister Ebo was one of the first African-American women to join what was then the Sisters of St. Mary, now the Franciscan Sisters of Mary. She and more than 50 St. Louisans flew down to Selma, Alabama three days after the infamous "Bloody Sunday" when civil rights marchers were attacked on the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

#CatholicSTL 

Click here for an obituary in the St. Louis Review

Click here for a statement in honor of Sr. Ebo from the Peace & Justice Commission

ST. LOUIS – Most Reverend Robert J. Carlson, Archbishop of St. Louis, released the following statement upon the death of Sister Antona Ebo, FSM:

I am saddened to hear of the passing of renowned civil rights leader Sister Antona Ebo. We will miss her living example of working for justice in the context of our Catholic faith.

I ask that the faithful of the Archdiocese of St. Louis join me in praying for the repose of the soul of Sister Ebo. Her family, friends, and her religious community will continue to be in our thoughts and prayers.

 May her soul, and the souls of all the faithful departed, rest in peace.

 

Sister Ebo was one of the first African-American women to join what was then the Sisters of St. Mary, now the Franciscan Sisters of Mary.  She and more than 50 St. Louisans flew down to Selma, Alabama three days after the infamous “Bloody Sunday” when civil rights marchers were attacked on the Edmund Pettus Bridge. 

#CatholicSTL